Lobster Spaghetti

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I’m fortunate enough to have a father whose hobbies include fishing for lobster. Having recently visited him and mum, my freezer is now home to a couple of these crimson beauties.

I’m usually a bit of a purist when it comes to lobster, generally serving it hot off the bbq doused in wild garlic butter, but thought I’d change it up a bit and make a simple but satisfying pasta.

I used the following:

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A cooked lobster, red onion, fresh dill, a generous glug or two of white wine, sour cream, spaghetti, and a portion of my slow roasted herby cherry tomatoes, using dill as the herb and throwing in a few mini bulbs of garlic to roast along with them (once cooked, I put the tomatoes in a bowl and squeezed the roasted garlic out if its paper on top. You can see it in the pic above).

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Remove all the white meat from the lobster (there are tutorials on YouTube or you can see a very quick and badly filmed time lapse of me doing it on my Facebook Page).

Finely slice the onion and saut√© over a medium heat in a little olive oil and butter. If you’ve roasted the garlic like I did, add it in once the onions have softened, otherwise you can add it earlier to allow it to cook. Turn the heat up and pour in approximately 100ml white wine. Allow it to reduce for a few minutes. Add the roasted tomatoes, a couple of dessert spoons of sour cream and a good pinch of chopped dill. Allow to simmer very gently while the spaghetti cooks. A few minutes before the spaghetti is ready throw in the lobster and allow to heat through. Check the seasoning, add salt and pepper to taste. Drain the spaghetti saving two or three tablespoons of the starchy water. Add the pasta water to the sauce to loosen it and make it velvety smooth, then add the spaghetti and toss to combine.¬† Sprinkle over more dill and serve. Delicious!

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Puy lentils with roasted veggies and goat’s cheese

This is the epitome of simple, rustic, midweek veggie dinner ideas. Packed with goodness, your body will smile at the thought of this delicious yet virtuous meal.

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Firstly chop up whatever veg you fancy and put in a roasting tray. I used onions, garlic, courgette, carrot, baby sweetcorn, peppers, butternut squash, leek and tomatoes. I like to use a peeler to get really thin curls of courgette and carrot.

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Season well with sea salt and black pepper, then splash in a generous glug of oil of your choice (I used olive on this occasion, but coconut works well too). Bake for about 45 mins in a hot oven turning regular.

Whilst the veggies are working their magic in the oven it’s time to get the lentils on. I use a small mug for three of us, and the lentils I use don’t need soaking, merely just rinsing under the tap.

Fry off some onion and garlic in olive oil until softened, adding in some fresh herbs halfway through. I used rosemary, thyme and a bay leaf. Once softened add the lentils and stir allowing them to absorb some of the flavours from the onion/garlic and herbs. Using the same mug you used to measure the lentils pour in half to a whole mug of red or white wine and let the alcohol cook off for a couple of minutes.

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Finally add in two to two and a half mugs of stock of your choice, season and reduce the meat to a simmer.  Stir regularly and cook for about 30 minutes, or until they’re at a texture you’re happy with. Puy lentils are renowned for naturally having more of an al dente texture then a lot of other varieties, so they won’t turn mushy.

Once the veggies and lentils are done to your liking, pour the pot of lentils into the tray of veggies abse mix well, allowing the lentils to absorb even more flavour. Serve in wide bowls (pasta bowls are perfect) and sprinkle with goat’s cheese. 

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